West and Central Africa: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (2 – 8 June 2020)

RAINS FLOOD IDP & HOST COMMUNITIES IN CENTRE-NORD REGION
Heavy rains on 5 June caused flooding in several communes hosting at least 140,000 IDPs who previously fled insecurity in Burkina Faso’s Centre Nord region, including Kongoussi, Pensa and Barsalogho.
According to local authorities and humanitarian agencies, at least 24 people suffered minor injuries, 669 shelters were destroyed, and several tons of food provisions wrecked. Urgent needs include the rehabilitation of 2,915 affected shelters; distribution of essential household items and water hygiene and sanitation kits to affected households, urgent relocation of IDPs living in flood-prone areas, and new food distributions. For displaced families in Koungoussi, this is the second flooding incident of the season.
CAMEROON
SIX CIVILIANS KILLED IN ARMED ATTACK
On 8 June, armed men killed six civilians in Eshobi village, Manyu division, South West region. The next day, non-state armed group members announced a lock-down of Mamfe, blocking all vehicles from entering or leaving the area. On 4 June, the Humanitarian Coordinator in Cameroon, Ms. Allegra Baiocchi, had called on all actors to protect civilians and ensure the unimpeded delivery of assistance to the most vulnerable women, children and men in the North West and South West regions, at a time when efforts are focused on scaling up to fight the COVID19 pandemic. She expressed her concern regarding the increasingly widespread practice by non-state armed groups of setting up illegal checkpoints along main supply routes. The reinforcing of “ghost town” days, the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in heavily frequented areas or the closure of inter-city transport for several days, have further constrained humanitarian operations, with dire consequences for the population they seek to support.
DR CONGO
12 EBOLA CASES IN EQUATEUR PROVINCE
Nine confirmed Ebola cases have been recorded since a new episode of the viral disease broke out on 1 June in the areas of Mbandaka, Bikoro and Wangata in Equateur Province; while three other probable cases are under examination. More than 300 people received a vaccine; and over 35,000 people have been screened. The health ministry, WHO and partners have deployed to the area to fight this new outbreak, the 11th in the country’s history. In a statement, the United Nations Emergency Relief Coordinator, Mr. Mark Lowcock, announced that he had allocated US $40 million from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) to help tackle health emergencies in the country.
NIGERIA
RISING COVID-19 COMMUNITY TRANSMISSIONS
Health authorities raised concerns over the escalating spread and community transmission of COVID-19. Statistics from the Nigeria Center for Disease Control (NCDC) indicate that 75 per cent of the country’s 12,801 COVID-19 cases have no traceable sources of infection, confirming important community transmission. With only about 78,000 tests conducted across the country and a population of nearly 200 million people, there are concerns that the situation may be worse than is being reported. The impending strike of doctors from 15 June over the shortages of PPE kits, non-payment of hazard allowance and lack of medical insurance – despite over 800 health workers contracting the virus while treating patients – will likely worsen the situation and response capacity in the coming weeks.

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

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