YPO Leaders Share Insights into Building an Optimal Board of Directors

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, Aug. 31, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — YPO, the premier chief executive leadership organization in the world, hosted a live Twitter chat discussing best practices and innovative strategies to create an optimal board of directors. Featured guests included YPO members and experienced board advisors Bernie Tenenbaum (@exprof2), founder and managing partner of Lodestone Global, […]

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More Evidence of ISIS’ Genocidal Intent

An important piece of journalism from the AP. “In exclusive interviews, photos and research, The Associated Press has documented and mapped 72 of the mass graves, the most comprehensive survey so far, with many more expected to be uncovered as the Islamic State group’s territory shrinks. In Syria, AP has obtained locations for 17 mass graves, including one with the bodies of hundreds of members of a single tribe all but exterminated when IS extremists took over their region. For at least 16 of the Iraqi graves, most in territory too dangerous to excavate, officials do not even guess the number of dead. In others, the estimates are based on memories of traumatized survivors, Islamic State propaganda and what can be gleaned from a cursory look at the earth. Still, even the known numbers of victims buried are staggering — from 5,200 to more than 15,000. Sinjar mountain is dotted with mass graves, some in territory clawed back from IS after the group’s onslaught against the Yazidi minority in August 2014; others in the deadly no man’s land that has yet to be secured.” (AP http://yhoo.it/2c6A94F)

Thousands Rescued At Sea. Again…”Rescuers saved 3,000 migrants in the waters off Libya on Tuesday as they tried desperately to reach Europe, a day after a record 6,500 people were rescued in the Mediterranean…After several weeks of relative calm in the stretch of Mediterranean between Italy and Libya, more than 1,100 people were rescued on Sunday and another 6,500 on Monday.Dramatic images distributed by the Italian coastguard showed children among the survivors crammed onto an old fishing boat… The total number of arrivals in Italy this year now stands at 112,500, according to the UN’s refugee agency and the coastguard, slightly below the 116,000 recorded by the same point in 2015. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bYwadd)

Zuckerberg Makes his first trip to Sub-Saharan Africa…The Facebook founder visited Sub-Saharan Africa for the first time on Tuesday, touching down in Lagos, Nigeria. He met with local businesses and developers in an effort to understand how Facebook could “better support tech development and entrepreneurship across Africa,” the company said in a statement. His visit included a trip to a Yaba, known as the Silicon Valley of Nigeria, where he toured a coding camp for kids and met with about 50 local startup founders and developers at CcHub, a local innovation center. (CNN http://cnnmon.ie/2c6Aa90 )

People stockpiled food, police manned major crossroads and soldiers were deployed at petrol stations and banks on Tuesday as Gabon braced for results from an election that will decide the fate of Ali Bongo and his family’s 50-year grip on power. (Reuters http://bit.ly/2bPslXf)

One hundred thirty men and boys remain missing in Cameroon nearly two years after a government crackdown on suspected members of the Nigeria-based Boko Haram extremists, Amnesty International said Tuesday, calling on the government to provide answers. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bXxMUw)

A Nigerian militant group, which has claimed responsibility for a series of attacks on oil and gas facilities in the southern Niger Delta energy hub in the last few months, said on Monday that it had halted hostilities. (Reuters http://bit.ly/2bPnw04)

Kenya is on its way to breaking the devastating cycle of drought, poverty and hunger over the next decade, a leading scientist said as he was named winner of a prestigious award. (Reuters http://bit.ly/2bxYcOM)

Children who escaped Boko Haram’s Islamic insurgency now are dying of starvation in refugee camps in northeastern Nigeria’s largest city as the government investigates the theft of food aid by officials. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bPgqKT)

South Africa’s recovery from its worst drought in over century could be stalled as anticipated rain relief from a La Nina weather system remains uncertain, the South African Weather Service said on Monday.  (Reuters http://bit.ly/2bPdvSr)

The United Nations is under increasing pressure to set up an independent inquiry into its Syria aid programme after a Guardian investigation found contracts worth tens of millions of dollars have been awarded to people closely associated with the president, Bashar al-Assad. (Guardian http://bit.ly/2c6zHnf)

Palestinian authorities are silencing dissent by cracking down on free speech and abusing local journalists and activists critical of their policies, a leading international human rights group said Tuesday. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bGe11Q)

In a series of 40 rescue missions launched off the northern coast of Libya, Italian Coast Guard personnel and several partner agencies saved around 6,500 migrants said to be traveling from Somalia and Eritrea, according to the coast guard. (VOA http://bit.ly/2bPcOIS)

Iraqi militias are recruiting children from camps for civilians displaced by conflict ahead of the long-awaited operation to retake militant-held Mosul, according to a report from Human Rights Watch Tuesday. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bPdOfV)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s office on Tuesday called criticism of Israeli settlement building “absurd” after a UN envoy strongly hit out at his government over the issue. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bGid1u)

Rubbish is again accumulating on some Beirut streets after protesters blocked access to a dump, raising fears that last summer’s garbage crisis, which provoked unprecedented street protests, could return. (VOA http://bit.ly/2bTaEp7)

The U.N. Humanitarian Coordinator says a “minimum” of 10,000 people have been killed and wounded in Yemen’s conflict. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bxXAZg)

Libya has shipped the last of its chemical weapons stocks out of the country, officials said Tuesday, under a UN-backed plan to ensure the arsenal could not fall into the wrong hands. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bPfUMN)

Sri Lanka is planning to begin testing its first web-based disaster damage and loss reporting system by the end of the year, authorities say. (TRF http://yhoo.it/2c8nmiF)

Bangladesh’s top court on Tuesday rejected a final appeal by the leader of an Islamist party against a death sentence for atrocities committed during the 1971 war of independence, lawyers said, meaning he could be hanged at any time. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bPcQjR)

Tea estates in southern India are hiring temporary workers during peak plucking season and denying these laborers basic rights as required by law, said a report released on Tuesday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bPcREl)

The United States and India pledged on Tuesday to deepen security and commercial ties at the start of an annual U.S.-India strategic dialogue in which tension with Pakistan over the disputed Kashmir region will also be discussed. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bGeiSi)

Fresh fighting between ethnic minority rebels and Myanmar’s military is overshadowing an upcoming peace conference led by Aung San Suu Kyi’s new civilian government, people involved in the talks said Tuesday. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bGiYHP)

Indonesia’s Disaster Agency said it is confident the country’s forest fires and haze of toxic smoke they send over Southeast Asia are unlikely to reach levels seen in 2015 because of favorable weather conditions and a quicker emergency response. (VOA http://bit.ly/2c5wkwC)

A prominent anti-Muslim group of Buddhist nationalists in Myanmar is criticizing former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan on social media, and accidentally taking actor Morgan Freeman down with him. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bPgeeG)

Former Haitian president Jean-Bertrand Aristide made a rare public appearance to support his party’s presidential candidate. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bTasq1)

The deadly collapse of a tailings dam last November at the Samarco mine, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton, was caused by drainage and design flaws, a report into Brazil’s worst-ever environmental disaster showed on Monday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bxTCQw)

Venezuela on Tuesday was set to expel a crew of Al Jazeera journalists who were intending to cover an opposition march against President Nicolas Maduro, the country’s union of journalists said. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bPfqq5)

…and the rest

The U.N health agency says three common infections transmitted by sex are increasingly resisting antibiotics, and is calling on doctors and patients to make sure the right drugs and doses are used. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bPfWEu)

The UN on Tuesday welcomed a decision by France’s highest administrative court to suspend a controversial ban on burkini swimwear, warning that the ban had fuelled religious intolerance and stigmatisation. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bPeXUR)

When The U.S. Backs Gay And Lesbian Rights In Africa, Is There A Backlash? (NPR http://n.pr/2c6znom)

Analysis: Where next for S.Sudan and rebel chief Machar? (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bTbAK7)

Secret aid worker: I’d rather help people abroad than my own community (Guardian http://bit.ly/2bxXZuF)

Brazil impeachment: Dilma Rousseff’s last stand? (BBC News http://bbc.in/2bPfHcJ)

Will These African Languages be Lost forever? (UN Dispatch http://buff.ly/2bPi676)

Communicating development in a post-factual world: How to win against the Daily Mail (Aidnography http://buff.ly/2bPhFto)

My Fellow Americans: Please Never, Ever Say (or Imply) That the United States Is the Only Country that Tries To Do Something About Corruption (Global Anticorruption Blog http://buff.ly/2bGl36I)

Why Australia should support negotiations for a nuclear weapon ban (The Intrepreter http://buff.ly/2bGkkT3)

Discussion

comments…

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News in Brief 30 August 2016 (AM) – Geneva

30 Aug 2016

Listen /

More than two million people have been displaced by Boko Haram militants acting inside Nigeria and on its borders. Photo: OCHA//Ivo Brandau

“Nigeria displaced are close to starvation”

In Nigeria, displaced people including children are on the verge of starvation and need help urgently after the liberation of areas previously held by terror group Boko Haram.

The appeal comes from Chaloka Beyani, who’s the United Nations expert on internally displaced persons (IDPs).

He’s just returned from north-east Nigeria, where government forces have pushed back the militants.

“The people who came out of those areas are severely malnourished, close to the point of starvation for most of them, including children, and I think that the scale of the crisis was not realised, there was no access in those areas, and I think now both the international community and the Nigerian government are having to scale up their efforts.”

According to Mr Beyani, well over two million people have been displaced by the violence.

He noted with concern that while most live with host communities, a smaller number have sought shelter in camps, where women and girls are subject to sexual exploitation.

More than 7,000 people rescued from Mediterranean Sea in 48 hours

Seven thousand and twenty seven – that’s the number of people who were rescued off the coast of Libya in just 48 hours, on Sunday and Monday.

According to UN partner the International Organization for Migration (IOM), many of those plucked to safety were sailing together in a flotilla of vessels unsuitable for the high seas.

It included 44 rubber dinghies, eight small wooden vessels and two bigger fishing boats.

IOM’s Joel Millman has more:

“We are aware of reports of two fatalities in the rescue yesterday; we saw photos, many people had lifejackets on, which was good, but numbers that high, it could be that two is not a number that could hold, but that’s our report of fatalities.”

IOM estimates the total number of migrants rescued this year off the coast of Libya at more than 111,000.

The agency has also noted that migrant and refugee arrivals in Greece – on the so-called eastern Mediterranean Sea route – were at their highest number since April, at around 2,800.

Back in January, nearly 70,000 people made the same journey by boat.

1.3 million children face no school meals in west and central Africa

And finally…school dinners are vital to child development, but 1.3 million students in west and central Africa may go without because of a funding shortfall, the World Food Programme (WFP) has warned.

Coinciding with the start of the academic year, the UN food agency says it needs USD$ 48 million to continue its school meals programme.

WFP spokesperson Bettina Luescher explains what happens when children don’t get the school meal they’ve come to rely on:

“What it means is they cannot concentrate, what it means is their bodies will not develop…they will never be as productive in the long run as other children will be. School meals help the children get – especially girls – get an education, they will have jobs, they will have fewer babies….it’s a huge benefit for families, for villages, for the whole society.”

Unless the funding comes through next month, WFP will be unable to help youngsters in Cameroon, Mali, Mauritania and Niger.

And by the end of this year, the agency says that assistance will run out for hundreds of thousands of children in another 11 countries.

Daniel Johnson, United Nations, Geneva

Duration: 3’27″

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Meridian Malaria Test Wins Prestigious Innovation Award

illumigene® Malaria Receives 1st Place Award at the Journées Internationales de Biologie /Association des Colloques Nationaux des Biologistes Conference in Paris CINCINNATI, Aug. 30, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Meridian Bioscience, Inc. (NASDAQ:VIVO) was awarded 1st place for innovation in emergency treatment and point-of-care testing for its illumigene® Malaria test at the 2016 JIB/ACNBH Conference this summer. […]

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Cleobrothers & Company, Inc. opens pharmaceutical office in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

Biotech company targets South America and Africa as part of global expansion goals COLUMBUS, Ohio, Aug. 30, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Cleobrothers & Co., Inc. announced that it has recently opened a sales and marketing office in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil as part of its global expansion plan for promoting and distributing pharmaceuticals and hi-tech medical […]

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Belt and Road Forum to Give Further Support to Chinese Energy Enterprises

YANTAI, China, Aug. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Chinese energy enterprises need repositioning themselves for going out and conducting international cooperation on production capacity, Ian He, CEO of Jereh Group said Thursday at the International Energy Investment & Financing Cooperation Forum held in Yantai, China. Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160827/401907 The forum is organized by China Chamber of […]

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SAINTS IN EUROPE: A breakdown of Inter Milan

He was linked with the Saints manager’s job earlier this summer but Frank de Boer will be at St Mary’s after all this season – as boss of Inter Milan.

The Dutchman was reluctant to follow in the footsteps of compatriot Ronald Koeman but headed for the San Siro earlier this month when the chance to succeed Roberto Mancini came up.

Inter have the greatest European competition pedigree of any of the teams currently in the Europa League.

The three-time UEFA Cup winners won the Champions League under Jose Mourinho in 2010.

Famously, they sealed their greatest triumph since winning back-to-back European Cups in the mid-1960s by beating Barcelona in the semi-finals before defeating Bayern Munich in the final.

Daily Echo: Inter Milan’s Auto Nagatomo and Celtic’s Ryan Christie battle for the ball during the International Champions Cup match at Thomond Park, Limerick. 

Inter went on to complete the club’s first treble, by adding the Serie A title and the Coppa Italia.

But Mourinho left to join Real Madrid at the end of that season and the subsequent years have been relatively fallow.

Last season’s fourth place was Inter’s best since finishing runners-up behind their great rivals AC Milan in 2010/11 under the Brazilian legend Leonardo.

But Mancini, Inter’s longest-serving manager since the great Giovanni Trapattoni (1986-91), was sacked after his relationship with the club’s owners, Suning Holdings, broke down.

Inter made an inauspicious start to the Frank De Boer era, losing their first game 2-0 at Chievo on Sunday.

But they have a rising star in Mauro Icardi. The Argentine striker is Inter’s captain at just 23 and has scored 47 goals in 78 Serie A starts.

He plays alongside Brazil-born Italy international Eder, Graziano Pelle’s strike partner at the European Championships.

Daily Echo:

Eder scored the winner in the Azzurri’s final group game against Sweden but has only scored one goal in 14 appearances for Inter since being signed on loan from Sampdoria in January.

There is a plethora of internationals in the rest of the Inter side. Their back four last Sunday was made up of former Italy defender Andrea Ranocchia, who plays alongside Brazil international Miranda, with Danilo D’Ambrosio and the diminutive Japan star Yuto Nagatomo occupying the full-back positions.

Defensive midfielder Geoffrey Kondogbia – capped five times by France – plays alongside Gary Medel, who knows what it is like to beat Saints.

The Chile star played in a 1-0 Premier League win at St Mary’s in April 2014, in one of his last games for Cardiff City before joining Inter for £9m.

He was joined in the Inter midfield against Chievo by two debutants; Argentina international Ever Banega having made the move from Sevilla and winger Antonio Candreva recently signed from Lazio.

Inter host Palermo tomorrow, while the next Milan derby is on November 20 – four days before Inter’s visit to St Mary’s.

The stadium

Daily Echo:

Stadio Giuseppe Meazza (the San Siro)

WITH a capacity of 80,018, the San Siro is the biggest stadium in Italy.

It hosted its fourth European Cup final last season, won on penalties by Real Madrid against Atletico Madrid after a 1-1 draw, as well as six games at the 1990 World Cup, including the opening game between Argentina and Cameroon.

A project of former AC Milan president Piero Pirelli, it was opened in 1926 has been shared with Inter since 1945.

Its official name is the Stadio Giuseppe Meazza after the two-time World Cup winner (1934, 1938) who played for Inter Milan and briefly for Milan in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s.

Both clubs have looked into building new stadiums in recent years, but plans have fallen through.

Located in the west of Milan five kilometres from Milan’s city centre, it is easily reached by metro or tram.

The city

Daily Echo: The skyline of Milan

MILAN is a giant, cosmopolitan international city renowned for its rich history, culture, fashion and sporting prowess.

The metropolis of 1.3million people is the capital of Italy’s northern Lombardy region and is one of Europe’s biggest cities, famed as one of the most fashionable places in the world.

The former Imperial Roman capital has grown to become an industrial powerhouse and a global capital of fashion, design and entertainment.

The Milanese have a religious addiction to calcio (football) with a fierce rivalry between Inter Milan and AC Milan – with both teams boasting illustrious trophy cabinets.

The city is the home of the country’s stock exchange – but its rich history is evident in its world-leading range of ancient historic buildings, museums, theatres and shopping parades.

Its luxury boutiques are a favourite haunt of the celebrities and stars and include high value brands for city-based fashion houses Armani, Versace and Dolce & Gabbana.

There is a huge selection of art collections, unparalleled shopping and one of Europe’s biggest trade-fair complexes and vibrant nightlife.

One of the most breathtaking landmarks is Gothic cathedral, the Duomo, with a pearly white facade, adorned with 135 spires and 3,400 statues which have taken 600 years in the making.

It has some of the largest stained-glass windows in Christendom.

The church of Santa Maria delle Grazie houses Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece, The Last Supper – a 5th Century mural depicts Jesus’s last meal with his disciples which takes pride of place in the refectory of the UNESCO World Heritage site.

La Scala opera house is considered by many to be one of the world’s most famous opera houses and has hosted leading lights such as Italy’s own Luciano Pavarotti.

The city is a shopper’s paradise with jewellers, bakers, carpenters and milliners (who derived their name from the city in the 16th Century) and a huge range of quality and choice on offer.

Top locations for browsing include the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele shopping arcade with chic boutiques and luxury stores, plus Quadrilatero d’Oro and the retail arteries of Via Brera, Corso Magenta, Corso Vercelli and Corso Buenos Aires.

There are countless opportunities to enjoy the best of Lombard and Italian food in a range of restaurants and cafés and plenty of opportunities for wine tasting.

Sleeping in Milan can be pricey. Unless you’ve got money to burn, your best bet is one of the surprisingly luxurious bed and breakfasts.

But there are budget places to stay including the Euro Hotel near Porta Venezia – but its competitive prices mean that it is popular with groups and fills up fast during major events, meaning that people should book online for the best rates and deals.

Autumns are generally pleasant, with temperatures ranging between 10 and 20 °C (50 and 68 °F) but can be characterised by higher rainfall.

Those wanting to stay longer can also take an hour trip to Lake Como – to the north and surrounded by snowcapped mountains and picturesque Mediterranean villas.

Venice is two-and-a-half hours to the east.

How to get there

Daily Echo:

MILAN has three airports – but London Gatwick is the only airport flying into the main city airport Milan Linate.

EasyJet offers the round trip for £60 for those prepared take the return Friday morning flight at 6am.

A more sociable 10.30am departure time from Milan costs around £80.

Fans can also choose to travel from London Luton to Milan Malpensa airport for around £55 however the airport is located 50km from the city centre.

Flights to all Milan airports take approximately two hours.

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Cameroon Out to Make History in Jordan

On 1 April 2016, Soline Djoubi could not quite believe what she was seeing. In a room containing FIFA World Cup� legend Roger Milla, several government ministers and the Chairman of the Cameroonian Football Association, all eyes were instead riveted on the young footballer and her team-mates, who had just helped to qualify Cameroon’s U-17 women’s side for the FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup for the very first time.

Like the other illustrious guests, the captain of the Bebe Lionnes (baby lions) was asked to share her thoughts, and when she spoke, her voice was timid and slightly hesitant – hardly surprising for a 16-year-old thrust into the limelight. A few months later, when FIFA.com caught up with her, she again spoke in undertones, but there was a marked increase in volume and confidence when the subject of Cameroon’s historic qualification for Jordan 2016 was broached.

“It’s been a while since we managed it, but it’s always a pleasure to talk about it,” she said enthusiastically. “Especially as we had a rough time of it during the qualifiers. That made it even more emotional when we finally made it.”

Early struggles

The aforementioned difficulties arose in Cameroon’s first-round tie with Ethiopia, which almost saw their adventure come to an abrupt end before it had properly begun. Despite recording a 2-1 home win in Douala, courtesy of a brace from Djoubi, they found themselves facing an early exit in the return leg in Addis Ababa.

“Ethiopia were leading 2-0 until the 87th minute, when we finally managed to score and make it 3-3 on aggregate,” she recalled, referring to Alexandra Takunda Engolo’s late strike, which led to general confusion about the rules. “We asked the referee if we were going to play extra time, which suited us as we could see that the Ethiopians were tired. But she explained that in our age category, you have to go straight to penalties.”

Djoubi slotted home her country’s first spot-kick, in a shoot-out that finished 5-4 in favour of Cameroon, after six attempts each. “Those two legs were really quite tricky,” she said. “But the trouble we had, the tiredness we felt, and all the hard work we put in – all that is in the past now. We’ve forgotten the qualifiers. We’re on great form and we’re ready for the U-17 World Cup. All we want now is to be there.”

It was current Cameroon coach Minkreo Birwe who first handed the captain’s armband to Djoubi, spotting within her the talent to motivate others. Indeed, she has already given some thought to her pep talks in Jordan. “I’ll tell my team-mates that this might be the only time in their lives that they get to play at a World Cup,” she explained. “We’ve been given an opportunity, and we have to seize it. We have to try to make history, which would be incredible. We must give 100 per cent, because it’s a World Cup, and there’s no room for error.”

That last point is particularly salient given that Cameroon’s opponents in Group B will be Germany, Canada and Venezuela, three teams with vast experience in the U-17 age category. But Djouba and her team-mates will likely take inspiration from their senior compatriots, who surprisingly reached the Round of 16 – where they were unfortunate to lose to China PR – on their FIFA Women’s World Cup� debut in Canada last year, having adopted an attacking, high-tempo style throughout the competition.

“They showed that, to go on a good run, you don’t have to be a team that’s used to appearing at World Cups, or have a huge amount of experience,” she said. “If they hadn’t missed their chances against China, they could have gone pretty far. They made everyone sit up and take notice, and they got a lot of young Cameroonian women interested in football.”

Daring to dream

The 16-year-old Bebe Lionnes skipper was one of those young women, even though her initial excitement for the beautiful game had different origins. “When I was little, I used to kick a ball around with my big brothers; I didn’t even know that women’s football existed,” she recounted, speaking as if her childhood was in the distant past, even though she was still taking part in summer youth tournaments barely three years ago.

At the age of 14, she joined AS Police. The following year, she moved to Canon Yaounde, and within a few months, she was invited to U-20 and senior-team get-togethers, where she gained the experience that enabled her to shine during the U-17 side’s two qualifying fixtures against Ethiopia and Egypt.

“I think Cameroon can win the U-17 Women’s World Cup; all of the teams that qualify should have that aim,” said the promising No8, who wears that number out of appreciation for Andres Iniesta, one of many top-level players she admires, such as national icon Samuel Eto’o, Lionnes striker Gaelle Enganamouit and Brazilian star Marta.

“It’s the first time we’ve taken part, but we intend to go as far as possible. Why shouldn’t we allow ourselves to dream? Our main asset is our mental attitude. It’s not enough to have good technique and be physically strong; you need great team morale as well.”

If Cameroon’s mindset and team spirit do end up taking them all the way, and they return home with the prestigious trophy, Djoubi can look forward to carrying out countless more interviews in her quiet yet self-assured voice.

FIFA.COM

On 1 April 2016, Soline Djoubi could not quite believe what she was seeing. In a room containing FIFA World Cup� legend Roger Milla, several government ministers and the Chairman of the Cameroonian Football Association, all eyes were instead riveted on the young footballer and her team-mates, who had just helped to qualify Cameroon’s U-17 women’s side for the FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup for the very first time.

Like the other illustrious guests, the captain of the Bebe Lionnes (baby lions) was asked to share her thoughts, and when she spoke, her voice was timid and slightly hesitant – hardly surprising for a 16-year-old thrust into the limelight. A few months later, whenFIFA.com caught up with her, she again spoke in undertones, but there was a marked increase in volume and confidence when the subject of Cameroon’s historic qualification for Jordan 2016 was broached.

“It’s been a while since we managed it, but it’s always a pleasure to talk about it,” she said enthusiastically. “Especially as we had a rough time of it during the qualifiers. That made it even more emotional when we finally made it.”

Early struggles

The aforementioned difficulties arose in Cameroon’s first-round tie with Ethiopia, which almost saw their adventure come to an abrupt end before it had properly begun. Despite recording a 2-1 home win in Douala, courtesy of a brace from Djoubi, they found themselves facing an early exit in the return leg in Addis Ababa.

“Ethiopia were leading 2-0 until the 87th minute, when we finally managed to score and make it 3-3 on aggregate,” she recalled, referring to Alexandra Takunda Engolo’s late strike, which led to general confusion about the rules. “We asked the referee if we were going to play extra time, which suited us as we could see that the Ethiopians were tired. But she explained that in our age category, you have to go straight to penalties.”

Djoubi slotted home her country’s first spot-kick, in a shoot-out that finished 5-4 in favour of Cameroon, after six attempts each. “Those two legs were really quite tricky,” she said. “But the trouble we had, the tiredness we felt, and all the hard work we put in – all that is in the past now. We’ve forgotten the qualifiers. We’re on great form and we’re ready for the U-17 World Cup. All we want now is to be there.”

It was current Cameroon coach Minkreo Birwe who first handed the captain’s armband to Djoubi, spotting within her the talent to motivate others. Indeed, she has already given some thought to her pep talks in Jordan. “I’ll tell my team-mates that this might be the only time in their lives that they get to play at a World Cup,” she explained. “We’ve been given an opportunity, and we have to seize it. We have to try to make history, which would be incredible. We must give 100 per cent, because it’s a World Cup, and there’s no room for error.”

That last point is particularly salient given that Cameroon’s opponents in Group B will be Germany, Canada and Venezuela, three teams with vast experience in the U-17 age category. But Djouba and her team-mates will likely take inspiration from their senior compatriots, who surprisingly reached the Round of 16 – where they were unfortunate to lose to China PR – on their FIFA Women’s World Cup� debut in Canada last year, having adopted an attacking, high-tempo style throughout the competition.

“They showed that, to go on a good run, you don’t have to be a team that’s used to appearing at World Cups, or have a huge amount of experience,” she said. “If they hadn’t missed their chances against China, they could have gone pretty far. They made everyone sit up and take notice, and they got a lot of young Cameroonian women interested in football.”

Daring to dream

The 16-year-old Bebe Lionnes skipper was one of those young women, even though her initial excitement for the beautiful game had different origins. “When I was little, I used to kick a ball around with my big brothers; I didn’t even know that women’s football existed,” she recounted, speaking as if her childhood was in the distant past, even though she was still taking part in summer youth tournaments barely three years ago.

At the age of 14, she joined AS Police. The following year, she moved to Canon Yaounde, and within a few months, she was invited to U-20 and senior-team get-togethers, where she gained the experience that enabled her to shine during the U-17 side’s two qualifying fixtures against Ethiopia and Egypt.

“I think Cameroon can win the U-17 Women’s World Cup; all of the teams that qualify should have that aim,” said the promising No8, who wears that number out of appreciation for Andres Iniesta, one of many top-level players she admires, such as national icon Samuel Eto’o, Lionnes striker Gaelle Enganamouit and Brazilian star Marta.

“It’s the first time we’ve taken part, but we intend to go as far as possible. Why shouldn’t we allow ourselves to dream? Our main asset is our mental attitude. It’s not enough to have good technique and be physically strong; you need great team morale as well.”

If Cameroon’s mindset and team spirit do end up taking them all the way, and they return home with the prestigious trophy, Djoubi can look forward to carrying out countless more interviews in her quiet yet self-assured voice.

Source: Confederation of African Football.

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Trouble in Lake Chad

Despite gains against Boko Haram a crisis looms in this region. “Nearly half a million children around Lake Chad face “severe acute malnutrition” due to drought and a seven-year insurgency by Islamist militant group Boko Haram in northeastern Nigeria, UNICEF said on Thursday. Of the 475,000 deemed at risk, 49,000 in Nigeria’s Borno state, Boko Haram’s heartland, will die this year if they do not receive treatment, according to the United Nations’ child agency, which is appealing for $308 million to cope with the crisis. However, to date, UNICEF said it had only received $41 million, 13 percent of what it needs to help those affected in the four countries – Chad, Nigeria, Niger and Cameroon – that border Lake Chad.” (Reuters http://bit.ly/2bSMVEY)

Report of the Day: Arab Spring Uprisings have significantly reduced life expectancy in the region…New from the Lancet. “ Between 2010 and 2013, Yemen, Tunisia, and Egypt lost about 3 months of life expectancy, whilst the war in Syria has erased 6 years off average life expectancy, with men expected to live to around 75 years in 2010, falling to about 69 years in 2013. For Syrian women, average life expectancy dropped from about 80 to 75 years over the same period.” (Euraklert http://bit.ly/2bSLTci)

Quote of the Day…“It is not that common for the ICRC to donate morgues. The fact that we now do is telling of the size of the human tragedy in Yemen.”  —  Rima Kamal, Yemen bases spokesperson for the Red Cross/Crescent (the Intercept http://bit.ly/2bSMXgh)

Bizarre arrest of the day: A Nigerian man is being charged for provoking people and “breach of peace” by naming his dog after President Muhammadu Buhari and painting the name twice on the pet, police said. (Reuters http://bit.ly/2bDlnC2)

Nearly half a million children around Lake Chad face “severe acute malnutrition” due to drought and a seven-year insurgency by Islamist militant group Boko Haram in northeastern Nigeria, UNICEF said. (Reuters http://bit.ly/2bjyiOH)

Burundi could scrap presidential term limits from its constitution after a commission set up to hear public views on governance said most citizens wanted no curbs on the number of times the head of state may seek re-election. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2blOEVP)

As Zimbabwe prepares for the bleak coming dry season in September and much of October, on the heels of more than a year of El Niño-induced drought, it finds itself running out of water. (TRF http://yhoo.it/2blOhdC)

The increasingly disgruntled people of Gabon go to the polls Saturday in a presidential election in which a last-minute opposition pact has robbed incumbent Ali Bongo of a clear run at a second term. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bKkgCy)

In Eastern Uganda and parts of Western Kenya, circumcising teenage boys is a practice carried out every two years and is performed as a sign of the community’s unity. The countries are now trying to figure out how to make these circumcision ceremonies appeal to tourists. (DW http://bit.ly/2bjSVXO)

African children will account for more than 40 percent of the world’s poorest people in 2030, almost double the current share, unless more is done to improve education and healthcare, a UK-based thinktank said on Thursday. (TRF http://bit.ly/2blObTn)

The United Nations human rights office called on Thursday for more light to be shed on the Saudi-led coalition air strikes in Yemen and for violations including attacks on hospitals to be punished. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bZcdn0)

Iraq’s parliament impeached Defence Minister Khaled al-Obeidi on Thursday over corruption allegations, removing him from office as the army gears up for an assault on Islamic State’s de facto capital, Mosul. (Reuters http://reut.rs/2bSLh6r)

Libya’s U.N.-backed government said on Wednesday it would continue seeking approval from the parliament based in the east of the country, despite members of the assembly voting to reject the fledgling administration. (Reuters http://bit.ly/2bj7XKD)

France’s foreign minister said on Thursday the Security Council had to respond firmly after a U.N. probe found that Syrian government troops were responsible for two toxic gas attacks. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bKk4mE)

Turkey sent more tanks into northern Syria on Thursday and demanded Kurdish militia fighters retreat within a week as it seeks to secure the border region and drive back Islamic State with its first major incursion into its neighbor. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bjQwwz)

An Israeli soldier shot dead a Palestinian motorist who had stabbed him and threw rocks from his car at a military vehicle in the occupied West Bank, the Israeli army said. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bKkk5d)

Authorities in eastern India are struggling to evacuate more than 100,000 people stranded in villages after floods intensified, killing more than 300 and driving hundreds of thousands from their homes, officials said on Thursday. (TRF http://yhoo.it/2bA2XF3)

Human Rights Watch on Thursday urged Chancellor Angela Merkel to bring up major rights violations, including a “policy of disappearances”, when Germany hosts the president of Turkmenistan next week. (AFP http://yhoo.it/2bA1gYa)

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un supervised the test-firing of a submarine-launched ballistic missile and declared it “the greatest success,” which puts the country in the “front rank” of nuclear military powers, official media reported. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bj7I2m)

The Philippines could suspend more mines in a crackdown on environmental abuses that has halted operations of 10 miners, a minister said, dismissing a claim by mineral producers the review was a “demolition campaign” against them. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bKjR2M)

Colombia’s president is moving fast to hold a plebiscite on a landmark peace deal reached with leftist rebels, presenting to congress Thursday the full text of the accord that he says will end a half-century of bloody combat. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bJMGfS)

Brazil’s Senate opened the impeachment trial of suspended President Dilma Rousseff on Thursday and hear witnesses for and against the leftist leader who is expected to be removed from office next week on charges of breaking budget laws. (VOA http://bit.ly/2bRTw1b)

The development community is eyeing the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria replenishment on Sept. 17 as a litmus test for aid under U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May and the new head of the country’s Department for International Development, Priti Patel. (Devex http://bit.ly/2bSLDKg)

Within hours of the earth shaking and houses collapsing, thousands of volunteers from all over Italy had descended on the country’s stricken central mountains to bring what help they could. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/2bRPmX4)

A former manager of a home for asylum-seekers in Germany has been charged with raping a Syrian woman. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bRP8zx)

More than 36,000 asylum seeker claims were made in Britain in the 12 months to June, according to government figures published on Thursday, the highest number in over a decade. (TRF http://yhoo.it/2bA2Glh)

Countries with dilapidated transport networks and unsafe power grids stand a greater risk of extreme natural events becoming humanitarian disasters, a report has found. (Guardian http://bit.ly/2bmrYzP)

The European Union’s executive branch rejected Thursday the U.S. government’s complaint that its probes into sweetheart tax deals between EU governments and big companies are hitting U.S. firms hardest. (AP http://yhoo.it/2bKknOl)

The game of thrones for Mexico’s drug cartels has begun (CNN http://cnn.it/2blPyfT)

Bold moves, tepid gains: Have central banks met their limit? (AP http://yhoo.it/2bZcTZH)

Could America’s War On Terror Creep Across Africa? (African Arguments http://bit.ly/2bA2t1t)

It’s time to talk about fraud in aid agencies (Guardian http://bit.ly/2bZe7nw)

How Colombia conflict developed over decades (AP http://yhoo.it/2briK7w)

Zimbabwe’s government is standing by as its wildlife is slaughtered (Guardian http://bit.ly/2bJLtoQ)

Why Sexism Is a Threat to Gender Equality Gains (New Times http://bit.ly/2bRQKsP)

Social Media Crackdown: The New Normal for Africa? (VOA http://bit.ly/2bJMcGB)

Direct democracy: lessons from Trump and Brexit for international development (ODI http://buff.ly/2bjCrll)

Zimbabwe’s rock and hard place (IRIN http://buff.ly/2bjCsWv)

Tribute: The Man Who Killed Smallpox (Goats and Soda http://buff.ly/2brV6I3)

TB in PNG: the impact on children (DevPolicy http://buff.ly/2brUhyV)

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